Types of Scissors for Cutting Practice

Hi! Today I wanted to share about my favorite types of scissors for young learners. If you have children at home, I hope you’re able to use this list to provide the tools they need to be successful. If you’re a teacher, you might consider having all of these options in your classroom. Your students can choose what’s most comfortable for them, and what leads to the least amount of frustration.

If you’re looking for cutting activities, be sure to check out my Spring Cutting Practice.

Spring Cutting Practice. Spring Fine Motor Practice Crafts and Ideas.

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Types of Scissors

There are many types of scissors, and I encourage you to try a few to find out the best fit for your students or children. Offering appropriate tools allows for every child to participate in the activities. The following are some of my scissor recommendations. I’ve listed them from MOST supportive to LEAST supportive. If you aren’t sure which type is best, you can give them several options. They’ll likely choose the ones that are easiest for them and provide the least frustration.

Loop Scissors

Loop scissors don’t require students to place their fingers inside the holes. They hold the scissors on the “outside” for more support and ease. They are easier to squeeze, and “bounce back” after each cut. I prefer the Special Supplies brand, but there are several available on Amazon. The Triadic brand is pretty sharp, so they would be ideal for an older child who still needs support with scissor skills.

Loop scissors for fine motor practice

Special Supplies Loop Scissors

Triadic Loop Scissors

Training Scissors

Training Scissors offer a little less support than Loop Scissors, but they still make it easier to cut than standard “kid safe” scissors. Training Scissors are spring loaded so they also “bounce back” after each cut. They are fairly dull so they won’t be able to cut several sheets at once, but they are a great starter set. You will want to make sure you have the correct left-handed/right-handed so they learn to hold them correctly.

Loop scissors for fine motor practice. Cutting activities and fine motor scissor skills.

Fiskars Training Scissors

LovesTown Training Scissors

Safety Scissors

Safety Scissors don’t offer any extra support, but they have a duller edge. If they are able to use training scissors appropriately and safely, they’re ready for safety scissors. Safety scissors are typical in classrooms, and are often called preschool or child scissors. The covers are great if students will be traveling with them in their backpacks or if they have to keep them in a box where they can’t see the tip.

Loop scissors for fine motor practice. Cutting activities and fine motor scissor skills.

Westcott Right and Left Handed Safety Scissors

Huhuhero Kids Scissors

Cutting Activities

After you find the right scissors, you can start allowing them to cut and practice. Even young preschoolers can use scissors if they’re supervised. The more opportunities we give them for practice, the safer and more efficient they will be!

Some of our favorite things to cut include:

  • Playdoh or Clay
  • Yarn
  • Notecards and Heavy Cardstock
  • Thick Ribbon

Once they are ready for paper cutting activities, I try to make it as engaging as possible! Some of my favorite spring crafts are below. You can find each of these in my Spring Cutting Activities Packet.

spring cutting practice. Fine motor activities for spring. Preschool fine motor activities. Cutting practice and scissor skills.
spring cutting practice. Fine motor activities for spring. Preschool fine motor activities. Cutting practice and scissor skills.
spring cutting practice. Fine motor activities for spring. Preschool fine motor activities. Cutting practice and scissor skills.

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